AMERICA'S FIRST THANKSGIVING PROCLAMATION
    and
    ON READING THE BIBLE
AMERICA'S FIRST THANKSGIVING PROCLAMATION
ONE METHODIST VOL. 1 NO. 4 November 1998

Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor: and

Whereas both houses of Congress have, by their joint committee, requested me "to recommend to the people of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peacefully to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness."

Now, therefore, I do recommend and assign Thursday, the 26th of November, next, to be devoted by the people of these states to the service of that great and glorious Being who is the beneficient Author of all the good that was, that is, and that will be; that we may then all unite in rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks for His care and protection of the people of this country previous to their becoming a nation; for the signal and manifold mercies and the favorable interpositions of His providence in the course and conclusion of the late war; for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty which we have since enjoyed; for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national one now lately instituted; for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed, and the means we have of acquiring and discussing useful knowledge; and, in general, for all the great and various favors which He has been pleased to confer upon us.

And also that we then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of nations, and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions; to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually; to render our national government a blessing to all the people by constantly being a government of wise, just and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed; to protect and guide all sovereigns and nations (especially such as have shown kindness to us), and to bless them with good government, peace and concord; to promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and us; and generally, to grant unto all mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as He alone knows to be best.

Given under my hand, at the city of New York, the third day of October, A.D. 1789. President George. Washington



ON READING THE BIBLE
by John Wesley

To candid, reasonable men, I am not afraid to lay open what have been the most intimate thoughts of my heart. I have thought . . . I am a creature of a day, passing through life, as an arrow through the air. I am a spirit come from God, and returning to God: just hovering over the great gulf . . . till, a few moments hence, I am seen no more. I drop into an unchangeable eternity! I want to know one thing, the way to Heaven . . . how to land safely on that happy shore.

God Himself has condescended to teach the way; for this very end He came from Heaven. He has written it down in a Book!

Oh, give me that Book! At any price give me the Book of God. I have it. Here is knowledge enough for me. I sit down alone, far from the busy ways of men and only God is here. In His presence I open and read His Book for the purpose of finding the way to Heaven. Is there a doubt concerning the meaning of what I read? Does everything appear dark and intricate? I lift up my heart to the Father of Light, asking wisdom and Thou givest liberally and upbraideth not. Thou hast said if any be willing to DO THY WILL he SHALL KNOW. I am willing to do; let me know Thy will.

I then search after and consider parallel passages of Scripture, comparing spiritual things with spiritual. I meditate thereon, with all the attention and eagerness of which my mind is capable. If any doubts remain, I consult those who are experienced in the things of God, and then the writings whereby being dead they yet speak, and what I thus learn, I teach.

we circuit riders even crossed the great Rocky Mountains, CO

QUOTE UNQUOTE

The interior journey of the soul from the wilds of sin into the enjoyed presence of God is beautiful. Ransomed men need no longer pause in fear to the Holy of Holies. God wills that we should push on into His presence and live our whole life there. A. W. Tozer

The grand reason why the miraculous gifts were so soon withdrawn was not only that faith and holiness were well-nigh lost, but that dry, formal, orthodox men began then to ridicule whatever gifts they had not themselves and to cry them all [down] as evil madness or imposture. John Wesley

We have forgotten the gracious hand which has preserved us in peace and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us, and have vainly imagined in the deceitfulness of our hearts that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own. Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving Grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us. Abraham Lincoln


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